Curriculum Resources


Procedures for Curriculum Submission

How to View Existing Courses and Programs or Propose, Edit and Delete Curriculum through CourseLeaf's LeepFrog Curriculum Software

  1. Log in to the LeepFrog Curriculum Inventory Management (CIM) System software using your TMCC credentials:
  2. If you do not have access or if you have never logged in, contact Julia Bledsoe who will enter your access credentials in user provisioning. This is not done by the IT Department.
  3. Once you log in, you stay logged in until you shut down your computer, there is no logout option.

Courses Inventory Management

To View Courses:

From the main curriculum screen, you can search for and view existing courses.

  • By entering a course prefix into the search box, you will get a list of all courses and titles. If an active proposal has not reached full approval it will display the current step in workflow and status.
  • Try selecting a course, you can view the course outline.

To Edit and Propose New Courses:

  1. From the main course curriculum screen, you can search for and edit existing courses, deactivate courses, or propose new courses.
    • If a course is not in workflow, you can propose changes. Proposal options are Edit or Deactivate.
    • If you choose to create a new course, you can familiarize yourself with different parts of the submission form and create a demo/test course by selecting demo/test under Effective Date, or you can start working on an actual submission.
  2. Once you have completed the desired submission, you can choose one of the following options at the bottom of the course form:
    • Select Cancel to shred the document (see the red Cancel button at the bottom of the form).
    • Save your work for a later date (see the white Save button at the bottom of the form).
    • Submit your work for approval through the workflow process (see the green Start Workflow button at the bottom page). Be aware that starting workflow moves the document into workflow and it is no longer available for you to edit. At any time, you can come back to the main course curriculum screen and search for the course to monitor the current workflow status.
    • Be aware as the submitter, your proposal will move through preapproval steps before coming to you again and requiring your approval. This approval is the official submission to the Curriculum Review Committee (CRC) for review. You will receive email notification when your proposal is at your step in the workflow for approval. 
  3. Submissions must make it to the CRC workflow step by the submission deadline for consideration at the next scheduled CRC meeting. View the CRC deadlines.

Please contact Julia Bledsoe for questions about the CourseLeaf or LeepFrog software programs.

Program Management

To View Programs:

From the main Program Management screen, you can search for and view existing programs. There is Search help at the top of the main screen.

  • The easiest way to search for your program is to enter a word from the title between two asterisks. i.e. *health* will return all titles containing the word health. The screen will display the program number and program name. Programs with active proposal will display the current step in workflow and status. These programs will not be available to edit.
  • By clicking on (selecting) a program, it will open in the window and you can view the program information. 

To Edit and Propose New Programs:

  1. From the main course Program Management screen, locate your program to propose edits, to deactivate. You can also start new program proposals here. Program proposals are not difficult but do come with a bit of a learning curve compared to course proposals. To avoid frustration contact Julia Bledsoe for assistance getting started. There are also generic tutorials available on the LeepFrog site.
    • If a program is not in workflow, you can propose changes. Proposal options are Edit or Deactivate.
    • If you chose to create a new program, you can familiarize yourself with the different parts of the program form and create a practice session by selecting Demo/Test program under Effective date or you can start working on an actual submission. Don’t worry, you cannot break anything at this stage of the proposal so explore.
  2. Once you have completed the desired proposal, you can choose one of the following options at the bottom of the program form:
    • Select Cancel to shred the document (see the red Cancel button at the bottom of the form).
    • Save your work for a later date (see the white Save button at the bottom of the form).
    • Submit your work for approval through the workflow process (see the green Start Workflow button at the bottom of the page). Be aware that starting workflow moves the document into workflow and it is no longer available for you to edit. At any time, you can come back to the main program Management screen and search for the program to monitor the current workflow status.
    • Be aware as the submitter, your proposal will move through preapproval steps before coming to you again and requiring your approval. This approval is the official submission to CRC for review. You will receive email notification when your proposal is at your step in the workflow for approval. 
  3. Submissions must make it to the CRC workflow step by the submission deadline for consideration at the next scheduled CRC meeting. View the CRC deadlines.

Please contact Julia Bledsoe for questions about the CourseLeaf or LeepFrog software programs.


Policies and Procedures for Curriculum Review

Course Program Review Policies

Per Article IX, Section 9.4 of the Faculty Senate Bylaws, the Curriculum Review Committee (CRC) is charged with supporting and advising faculty on all course, program, degree and certificate submissions.

The committee recognizes that there are instances in which minor revisions to an existing course, degree, emphasis or certificate may bypass full committee review. In cooperation with the Assessment and Planning Office, the CRC identifies the following exceptions wherein proposed changes to an existing course, degree, emphasis or certificate can be made directly through the Assessment and Planning Office:

  • Requests for title changes from NSHE System Office
  • Minor verbiage updates required for accreditation purposes

The following course changes can be made directly through the Assessment and Planning Office, so long as the course has been reviewed by CRC within the past 4 academic years:

  • Class size
  • Grading system
  • Transfer status
  • Contact type (e.g., lab, lecture, clinical, practicum)

The following program changes can be made directly through the Assessment and Planning Office (in coordination with Academic Advisement and Admissions and Records), so long as the program has been reviewed by CRC within the past 4 academic years:

  • Updates to course sequencing; excluding the addition of courses and the deletion of courses from a program
  • Statement of recommended general education or elective courses

Any of the aforementioned changes made through the Assessment and Planning Office will be communicated to the CRC Chair, so that changes can be included in the committee agenda as informational items.

Curriculum Submission Workflow

Once an initiator has selected “start workflow” for a course or program proposal, their submission will automatically move through the following review steps. Please note, once workflow has begun, the initiator cannot make edits unless the submission is "rolled back" or until the submission reaches the initiator step in workflow under Step 5.

  • Step 1: Technical Review
    • Courses: Representatives from Admissions and Records review and verify course credits, contact hours, course components, repeatability, etc. NSHE officer reviews for transferability and common course numbering
    • Programs: Representatives from Admissions and Records review and verify total number of credits, embedded content hours, required program components, etc. NSHE officer reviews for appropriate NSHE proposal, budget, and/or deletion forms. The Academic Advisement Office reviews for transfer, hidden prerequisites, course sequencing and GE verification.
  • Step 2: Department Chair Review
  • Step 3: Dean Review
  • Step 4: Financial Aid Notification
    • Courses: Representatives from Financial Aid are notified of proposed course submissions.
    • Programs: Representatives from Financial Aid review program proposal for funding eligibility
  • Step 5: Initiator
    • Following steps 1-4, you will recieve a notification. The initiator must "approve" the submission and move it forward to Step 6 prior to the CRC submission deadline for consideration at the next scheduled CRC meeting date. As a note, the initiator can make edits to their submission at this step in the workflow.
  • Step 6: CRC Review (note: this is the "official submission" step for the submission deadline.)
  • Step 7: CRC Chair Review
  • Step 8: VPAA Review
  • Step 9: NSHE Representative Review (Associate Dean of Assessment and Planning)
    • Academic Affairs Council (AAC) and Board of Regents (BOR) Representative Review (held at this step if there are NSHE approvals pending)
    • AAC review is required for all new/substantive changes/deletions of programs (degrees or certificates). BOR review is required for all new/substantive changes/deletions of degrees, except transfer AA/AS degrees.
  • Step 10: Programs added to Catalog by catalog representative.
  • Step 11: Programs and courses added to PeopleSoft by PeopleSoft representative.

Course and Program Resources


Guidelines for Reviewers

CRC Member Roles

Please be diligent and do a thorough review of the submitted courses and programs. Please complete your reviews prior to the deadline. You will be notified that you have reviews pending via email.

  • Provide feedback to reviewers on MCO submissions
  • Review general education, diversity and embedded content submissions
  • Review programs and certificates submissions
  • Provide input on curriculum and program developments and concerns

Typical Work Flow

Submission deadline (1 week) > member reviews due on Friday before scheduled meeting (1 week) > CRC meeting

Key Components of a Course Outline

  • Course objectives provide a broad overview of the course goals
    • Example: The objectives of the course are...
      • To introduce the basic principles of pharmacology used in veterinary practices.
  • Learning Outcomes identify what students will be able to do, in demonstration of a course objective being met
    • Example: Students will identify and classify the drugs used in modern veterinary medicine.
  • Measures specify how a stated learning outcome will be assessed
    • Example: Skills will be assessed by examinations and quizzes. Exams are evaluated with a key.

Example Questions to Consider

  • Is there alignment between course objectives, learning outcomes and measures?
  • Are the learning outcomes measurable?
  • Do the proposed learning measures clearly articulate how student work will be evaluated?
  • If the course is a GE course please review the GE component and evaluate if the selected GE criteria apparent within the stated course learning outcomes?
  • Is the submission clean, free of typos and easy to understand?

Approve vs. Decline

  • If you have no corrections or suggested changes, please vote "Yes" to approve the course. If you vote "Yes" but have recommendations, those will not be seen by the submitter.
  • If you have corrections or suggested changes, please vote "No" and include your recommendations in the comments area, so I can forward these to the submitter. It is ok to vote "No" a submission, this doesn’t mean the course or program won’t make it to the consent agenda, it just means there are some issues that warrant attention.

Presenting Feedback to Submitters

  • Please be courteous and constructive when making a recommendation
    • If you have a recommendation to make, start with something positive
    • Provide an example to illustrate your point
    • Example: Your course objectives and student learning outcomes show clear connectivity. Good work. One recommendation: measure 1 indicates that "students will discuss." As is, this doesn’t specify how student discussion will be measured. An example of a measure would be "student discussion will be evaluated with a rubric that defines categories of accuracy and clarity."

How to Write Course Objectives, Learning Outcomes and Measures

Course Objectives

  • Please use broad statements that describe the intended goals of the course, which can serve the course for many years.
  • Identify key elements that must be taught every time the course is taught.
  • The course objectives should be written so that they clearly align with the student learning outcomes.
    • Tip: Start the course objective section with "The objectives of the course are…" to ensure that the focus is on what the course will provide, rather than what the student will do.
    • Sample: The objectives of the course are:
      • To reinforce knowledge of physiology used in veterinary practices.
      • To introduce the basic principles of pharmacology used in veterinary practices.
      • To synthesize the principles of physiology and pharmacology in the application of pharmaceuticals commonly used in veterinary practices.
      • To define meanings and terms used in business practices
      • To introduce analytical methods associated with cost analysis
      • To demonstrate how to set up a computer lab
      • To reinforce basic critical thinking techniques

Student Learning Outcomes

  • The Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) are the measurable knowledge, skills, and abilities students can demonstrate and will carry forward as a result of their experiences in the course.
  • All students will be expected to meet the SLOs, no matter the section and faculty member.
  • Specified student learning outcomes should align with the (broader) Course Objectives.
  • State the outcome simply and concisely. Why say "Students will demonstrate the ability to construct boxes" when you can say "Students will construct boxes?"
  • There is no predetermined or required number of SLOs. The number of SLOs should reflect the complexity of the course. Faculty must measure all outcomes, but may choose which outcomes to assess through the course assessment cycle.
    • Tip: Start the Student Learning Outcomes section with "Students will…" and use verbs which reflect depth of knowledge.
    • Use verbs like:
      • Explain
      • Analyze
      • Construct
      • Design
      • Incorporate
      • Synthesize
      • Reinforce
      • Compare and contrast
      • Identify
      • Apply
    • Avoid verbs like:
      • Understand
      • Appreciate
      • Gain knowledge of

Course Level SLO Considerations

Course level considerations included below are intended only as recommendations. Overlap among these levels may and probably will occur.

  • 100-Level Courses: Students will be able to identify, describe, recognize, use basic competencies, knowledge, skills needed to prepare for your program.
  • Intermediate Level Courses (200-300): Students will discuss, articulate, examine, compare, contrast major/disciplinary knowledge and skills needed to advance through your program.
  • 400-Level Courses: Students will relate, argue, assess/evaluate, analyze, apply, advanced knowledge and skills and/or synthesis of knowledge and skills expected of seniors.

Measures

  • The measures are statements that describe how the learning outcomes are measured.
  • Reflect the ways in which all faculty teaching the course will measure proficiency (so all faculty must agree on common measures).
  • Establish a means for consistent evaluation across all sections of a course.
  • Include the mechanism for measurement—answer keys, holistic or dimensional rubrics, task sheets, agency requirements, etc.

Sample Learning Outcomes and Measures

100-200 Level Courses
  • Student Learning Outcome 1: Students will identify and classify the drugs used in veterinary medicine.
  • Measure 1: Skills will be assessed by examinations and quizzes.  Exams are evaluated with a key.
     
  • Student Learning Outcome 2: Students will calculate drug doses based on physiology of animals in veterinary practice.
  • Measure 2: Competence will be measured with examinations and quizzes graded with a standardized key.
     
  • Student Learning Outcome 3: Students will synthesize general pharmacological concepts to the practice of veterinary medicine.
  • Measure 3: Competence will be evaluated through essay questions and a written final paper and graded with a pre-determined rubric.
300-400 Level Courses
  • Student Learning Outcome 1: Students will differentiate between the drugs used in veterinary medicine.
  • Measure 1: Skills will be assessed by examinations and quizzes.  Exams are evaluated with a key.
     
  • Student Learning Outcome 2: Students will apply drug calculations and doses based on physiology of animals in veterinary practice.
  • Measure 2: Competence will be measured with examinations and quizzes graded with a standardized key.
     
  • Student Learning Outcome 3: Students will synthesize general pharmacological concepts to the practice of veterinary medicine.
  • Measure 3: Competence will be evaluated through essay questions and a written final paper and graded with a pre-determined rubric.

Embedded Curriculum

Embedding General Education Requirements into AAS Degree Programs

In 2012, the Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents approved changes to the AAS degree that will allow programs to have more flexibility in the curriculum of these programs. Specifically, embedding per NSHE policy (Title 4, Chapter 16, Page 17) states that "Mathematics and Science may be included as courses or clearly identified as content in other required courses. Human Relations must be included as a course or be clearly identified as content included in other required courses for an Associate of Applied Science."

The following are recommendations on addressing embedded curriculum in order to ensure we meet accreditation standards.

The Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (Standard 2.C.11) states:

"The related instruction components of applied degree and certificate programs (if offered) have identifiable and assessable learning outcomes that align with and support program goals or intended outcomes. Related instruction components may be embedded within program curricula or taught in blocks of specialized instruction, but each approach must have clearly identified content and be taught or monitored by teaching faculty who are appropriately qualified in those areas."

With regard to embedded instruction, there are several pieces that must be assured:

  1. There must be identifiable and assessable learning outcomes with regard to this content, and the assessment of that component of the course should be done separately to assure its delivery, and
  2. There must be clearly identified content, including the amount of hours of content delivery, and
  3. Content must be taught/monitored by teaching faculty appropriately qualified in those areas.

In addition to the option of embedded curriculum, accreditation also speaks to "specialized instruction" which may include identification of specific courses within the curriculum, such as "culinary math".
With regard to this type of instruction, there are several pieces that must be assured:

  1. There must be identifiable and assessable learning outcomes with regard to this content, and
  2. Content must be taught by teaching faculty appropriately qualified to teach the content.

Further Assistance

For questions related to the Curriculum Review Committee or procedures for curriculum submission, please contact Virginia Irintcheva.