Program/Unit Review Handbook


Introduction

Truckee Meadow Community College's Program/unit Review (PUR) is one measure of its commitment to academic excellence. PUR is a cyclical opportunity for programs and units to reflect on their contributions to the College and to strategize about future improvement, sustainability, and growth. The results of PUR help to guide the College’s academic planning, budgeting, and decision-making.

The goals of PUR are to:

  1. Improve teaching, student learning, and program completion.
  2. Assess program or unit viability, quality, and curriculum currency.
  3. Develop program or unit strategic plans that align with the overall mission and strategic directions of the College.
  4. Provide data and evidence to support resource allocation and decision-making.

The College's PUR process complies with the Board of Regents (BOR) policy, as well as the Northwest Commission on College and Universities (NWCCU) regional accreditation Standards.

The BOR Handbook (Title 4, Chapter 14, Section 5) states that “a review of existing academic programs shall be conducted by the universities, state college, and community colleges on at least a ten-year cycle to assure academic quality and to determine if need, student demand, and available resources support their continuation.”

Furthermore, NWCCU requires that “The institution documents, through an effective, regular, and comprehensive system of assessment of student achievement, that students who complete its educational courses, programs, and degrees, wherever offered and however delivered, achieve identified course, program, and degree learning outcomes. Faculty with teaching responsibilities are responsible for evaluating student achievement of clearly identified learning outcomes.” (Standard 4.A.3), and that “Results of core theme assessments and results of assessments of programs and services are: a) based on meaningful institutionally identified indicators of achievement; b) used for improvement by informing planning, decision making, and allocation of resources and capacity; and c) made available to appropriate constituencies in a timely manner.” (Standard 4.B.2).

PURs are conducted on a five-year cycle; however, depending on changes affected a program/unit or numerous other circumstances, a program/unit may be monitored more or less frequently.

During the PUR process, the program/unit compiles a self-study report that summarizes all assessment activities, reviews their program’s student demographics and enrollment trends, evaluates their resource adequacy, and presents a strategic plan to maintain or improve the program moving forward.

The self-study is divided into the following components:

  1. Program/Unit Overview
  2. Current Status of the Program/Unit
  3. Curriculum
  4. Program/Unit Assessment
  5. Enrollment and Demographics
  6. Student Success
  7. Resources
  8. Future Directions

Upon completion, the Academic Standards and Assessment (ASA) Committee, academic dean and Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) review the self-study.

Each level of review provides findings and recommendations, which are published along with the self-study on the Assessment and Planning website. The VPAA’s summary and review serve as the official findings and recommendations to the College President and Board of Regents.

Resource requests are forwarded through the deans and VPAA to the Resource Allocation Process (RAP).

Roles and Responsibilities Throughout the Program/Unit Review Process

A. Self-study Committee

  1. Membership: Ideally, five to ten members.
    1. Self-study chair: department chair, director, coordinator or lead instructor. As noted in the Faculty Annual Plan, in some circumstances, active participation in the PUR may be required of specific faculty members.
    2. No less than one faculty member from a program/unit, in addition to the self-study chair.
    3. One faculty member from outside the academic division (may include counseling and library).
    4. One classified staff member.
    5. One student or alumni member.
    6. College and Technical Education (CTE) programs must include at least one member of their advisory committee.
    7. Optional representative from Student Services.
    8. Optional representative from an external organization (articulation committee, trade organization, etc.).
  2. Self-study Chair Duties
    1. Work with the academic dean to identify committee members.
    2. Attend PUR orientation held in the fall semester Professional Development Days at the beginning of the program review year.
    3. Attend monthly workshops with Academic Standards and Assessment (ASA) members as necessary to accurately compile and analyze prepared data for self-study.
    4. Schedule and monitor activities necessary for completion of self-study.
    5. Compile the complete self-study from committee member contributions and submit to the academic dean by the self-study deadline.
    6. Represent the self-study committee by meeting with ASA members and the academic dean to provide an overview as well as answer questions related to the self-study findings and development strategies.
    7. Compile or work with the department chair to compile and submit annual progress reports (APRs) by the established deadline.
  3. Self-study Committee Member Duties
    1. Participate actively in researching findings and developing strategies.
    2. Write sections of the self-study report as agreed upon by the committee membership.
    3. Incorporate results of student learning outcomes into the analysis of program/unit’s effectiveness.
    4. Validate findings for accuracy and relevance.
    5. Provide citations for all external data presented in self-study.
    6. Sign preliminary report for submission to appropriate academic dean’s office on or before self-study deadline as approval of the submission. Electronic signatures are OK.
    7. Revise self-study upon discussion and recommendation from the academic dean.
    8. Submit signed, electronic copies of final self-study to dean for subsequent submission to the ASA.
    9. Present findings to appropriate stakeholders (advisory committees, accreditation agencies, etc.) as necessary.

B. Program/unit Review

Program/unit review is one of the duties assumed by the ASA Committee in collaboration with the Assessment and Planning Office.

  1. Membership
    1. PUR co-chairs: The chair of the Academic Standards & Assessment Committee and associate dean of Assessment & Planning. The associate dean of Assessment & Planning only serves as co-chair of the PUR process and not the ASA Committee as a whole.
    2. Members of the ASA Committee, which should include:
      1. At least one faculty representative from each academic division.
      2. One representative from the Institutional Research Office.
      3. At least one representative from Student Services.
    3. Optional: One department chair selected by academic deans (not under review).
    4. Optional: One academic dean.
    5. Optional: One representative from Finance Administration or the Budget Subcommittee of the Planning Council.
  2. Co-chair Duties
    1. Organize orientation for self-study chairs.
    2. Conduct workshops to assist self-study chairs with the self-study.
    3. Schedule any meetings outside of regular ASA meetings for program review as needed.
    4. Conduct review meetings with self-study chairs and respective deans.
    5. Compile and submit final ASA Committee recommendations for each self-study to the VPAA.
    6. Conduct on-going evaluation of program/unit review process and recommend improvements to the VPAA.
    7. Maintain communication with the campus community through various media, such as web pages, email, etc.
  3. Member Duties
    1. Help organize, as needed, the orientation and workshops for self-study chairpersons.
    2. Participate, as needed, in workshops to assist self-study chairs with the self-study.
    3. Conduct thorough reviews of self-studies, conduct constructive discussions with self-study representatives, and formulate appropriate recommendations by established deadlines.
    4. Complete recommendations for submission to the VPAA by established deadlines.

C. Academic Dean Duties

  1. Work with the department chair and self-study chair to establish the committee and help to coordinate orientation sessions as needed prior to the start of the formal process.
  2. Provide a 3–5 year summary of program/unit’s funding sources and part-time faculty dollar allocation for the Resources section prior to self-study chair orientation. Assist self-study committee with funding analysis.
  3. Confirm accuracy, relevance, and completeness of the self-study and supporting documentation by the established deadline.
  4. Validate self-study analysis and strategies by the established deadline.
  5. Work with the self-study committee to make necessary revisions prior to submission to the ASA Committee for review.
  6. Complete a dean’s review of the self-study and forward findings along with an electronic copy of the final self-study to the ASA Committee by the established deadline.
  7. Participate with self-study chair in the review and discussion of self-study findings with the ASA Committee.
  8. Include appropriate PUR findings and recommendations in the division’s strategic planning and resource allocation decisions.
  9. Ensure that the self-study 5-year plan and PUR recommendations form the basis of annual progress reports (APRs) within the department/unit.
  10. Review APRs submitted by the department/program/unit and submit comments/findings to the VPAA on PUR recommendations until each is implemented or revised.

D. Vice President of Academic Affairs/Assessment and Planning Office Duties

  1. Maintains a master calendar for Program/Unit Reviews on a five year cycle.
  2. Notifies the Institutional Research Office, academic deans, and scheduled program/units of upcoming self-studies by mid-April of the academic year prior to the self-study deadline.
  3. Helps to organize and participates in self-study orientation sessions established by PUR co-chairs.
  4. Reviews self-study along with ASA Committee and dean’s findings and recommendations. May reject, revise, or accept report and/or recommendations.
    1. If Vice President of Academic Affairs accepts self-study and recommendations, he/she submits report and recommendations to the College President.
    2. If Vice President of Academic Affairs rejects self-study and/or recommendations:
      1. Notifies self-study chair, dean and ASA Committee of rejection.
      2. Enumerates specific deficiencies that must be addressed.
      3. Establishes with dean and ASA Committee a new deadline for revised self-study.
    3. If Vice President of Academic Affairs revises self-study and/or recommendations:
      1. Notifies self-study chair, dean and ASA Committee of planned revisions.
      2. Provides opportunity for discussion and/or input prior to making revisions.
      3. Once revisions are finalized, follows procedures of accepted recommendations.
  5. Provides updates and recommendations as needed to the Planning Council.
  6. Provides information on finance and budget recommendations by unit.
  7. Revises College planning documents upon receipt of President’s approval.
  8. Provides annual review of programs to Nevada System of Higher Education and makes presentations as requested.
  9. Upon the President's approval of final recommendation, coordinates APRs.
    1. Prepares and distributes APR templates to appropriate dean, department chair/director/coordinator, and self-study chair.
    2. Gathers APRs from deans for each program until satisfactory responses have been received on all final recommendations.
    3. Summarizes progress report activities for the President annually.

E. College President Duties

  1. Reviews self-study and may reject, revise, or accept report and/or recommendations:
    1. If the President accepts self-study and its recommendations, he/she notifies Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA), academic dean and self-study chair.
    2. If the President rejects self-study and/or recommendations:
      1. Notifies VPAA of rejection.
      2. Enumerates specific deficiencies that must be addressed.
      3. Establishes with VPAA a new deadline for revised self-study.
    3. If the President revises self-study and/or recommendations:
      1. Notifies VPAA of planned revisions.
      2. Provides opportunity for discussion and/or input prior to making revisions.
      3. Once revisions are finalized, follows procedures of accepted recommendations.
    4. Receives annual updates from VPAA on progress reports.
  2. Advocates as necessary for resources to continue, improve, or the approval for elimination of the instructional program/unit if necessary.

Timeline

A. Preparation Timeline

  1. Mid-April: Vice President of Academic Affairs notifies deans and the Institutional Research Office of scheduled self-studies.
  2. Early May: Dean identifies self-study chairperson and notifies PURC and the Institutional Research, Analysis, and Effectiveness Office.
  3. Early-Mid May: Self-study chairperson and dean select all members of self-study committee.
  4. Mid-late May: Assessment and Planning Office notifies self-study chairperson of upcoming orientation.
  5. Summer: Institutional Research Office prepares data packages for self-studies.

B. Self-Study Timeline

Each self-study committee should establish an internal timeline with their department chair and dean.

  1. August Professional Development Days: Self-study chairperson attends PUR orientation hosted by ASA Chair and Associate dean of Assessment and Planning.
  2. August, following PUR Orientation: Self-study committee begins work.
  3. September–October: Workshops for self-study chairs/committee members hosted by ASA and Assessment and Planning Office
  4. November 1: Self-study chair provides the ASA, signed by the dean, with a progress report of the committee work to date.
  5. December 1 (or following Monday): Complete self-study report is submitted to the dean (electronic copy).
  6. Early January: Self-study chair and dean meet to discuss corrections to self-study requested by dean.
  7. January, by start of Spring Semester classes: dean submits complete, corrected, and signed self-study report along with signed dean’s findings and recommendations to the ASA Committee (electronic copies, please).
  8. February-March: ASA Committee reviews self-studies.
  9. March-April: ASA Committee holds review sessions with self-study chair and dean.
  10. May: ASA Committee submits self-study with recommendations to Vice President of Academic Affairs.
  11. Summer/early Fall: VPAA submits recommendations to President.
  12. Fall: President prioritizes recommendations towards institutional planning and advises VPAA, dean and self-study chair of acceptance of self-study by letter.

C. Implementation of PUR Recommendations Timeline

  1. By October: VPAA/Assessment and Planning Office submits annual review of programs to NSHE.
  2. Early Fall: VPAA reviews findings and recommendations with dean and self-study chair and mutually establishes action plan and timeline for APR.
  3. Fall: Dean and department chairs/directors/coordinators implement PUR recommendations into division, department, and faculty annual plans.
  4. January: VPAA/Assessment and Planning Office distributes Annual Progress Report (APR) templates to deans/chairs.
  5. October 1 (following year): Self-study chairperson submits APRs to the dean; budget requests are considered for the upcoming resource allocation process (RAP)
  6. November 1 (following year): dean submits Annual Progress Report to the VPAA/Assessment and Planning Office.

PUR Process

  1. Self-study completed by program/unit faculty.
  2. Dean's review: findings and recommendations.
  3. ASA review: findings and recommendations.
  4. Self-study chair and dean meet with ASA Comittee to review findings.
  5. ASA Committee submits findings/recommendations to VPAA
  6. VPAA reports their summary of findings/recommendations to President.
  7. President reviews findings and notifies VPAA, ASA, dean and self-study chair of decision to accept, modify or reject.
  8. VPAA reviews their findings and recommendations with dean and self-study chair and mutually establishes actions and timeline for APR.
  9. VPAA provides annual review of programs to NSHE and selects examples of programs to present to BOR.
  10. Administrators and faculty initiate approved recommendations.
  11. Faculty and administrators report progress to VPAA through Annual Progress Reports (APRs); VPAA provides summary of APR to the ASA Committee.

Program/Unit Review Self-Study Report

A template and files will be distributed to self-study chairs at the PUR Orientation meeting.

Instructions

  • Please adhere to all deadlines presented in the Timeline.
  • Please provide all information requested in each of the self-study sections if it applies to your program/unit. If the requested information does not apply, you may respond with "Not Applicable." On the other hand, the self-study should include any additional information/findings pertinent to the program/unit.
  • Accredited programs may provide requested information in this Program/Unit Review by indicating a reference to a specific page in their official accreditation self-study report, and then including that page in the Appendices.
  • Please cite any external sources used in the body of the report, and include a References page in the Appendices.
  • Where applicable, please include the following Appendices: (1) a References page for any external references cited in the body of the report, (2) a copy of each program (degree, emphasis or certificate) worksheet from the most recent College Catalog (provided in your PUR Supporting Documents folder), (3) a copy of any transfer agreements between your program and another institution, (4) a copy of any College Technical Education (CTE) agreements between your program and high schools, (5) copies of all advisory board minutes since the last PUR, (6) a copy of the most recent programmatic accreditor’s findings and recommendations, (7) any other pertinent information.
  • Please use the formatting established in the report template. Some sections of the self-study will be copied/pasted directly for required annual reporting to NSHE and for the College’s planning processes.

Self-Study Outline

This should reflect the self-study report template.

I. Program/Unit Overview

  1. Program or Unit Description
    Describe the program/unit, including but not limited to the following: academic division that the program/unit belongs to, the academic areas and degrees/certificates offered, average student enrollment, number of full-time faculty, type of curriculum or pedagogical approaches, and any other pertinent aspect of the program/unit.
  2. Program or Unit Mission
    State the department or unit’s mission, and describe how it aligns to the College’s Mission and Core Themes. If your department or unit does not currently have a mission statement, please discuss among your colleagues and develop one.
  3. Degrees, Certificates, or Courses Offered
    List the degrees and certificates offered by the program; or, the courses offered if the program/unit does not offer any degrees or certificates.
  4. Program (Degree or Certificate) Learning Outcomes
    If applicable, list the program learning outcomes for each degree and certificate offered in your department or unit.
  5. General Education Learning Outcomes
    If applicable, please indicate the General Education (GE) competencies and student learning outcomes in any GE courses assessed by the department.
  6. Five-year Plan Summary
    After writing the PUR self-study, summarize the department/unit's plan for the next 5 years.
    • What are the major objectives that the department/unit hopes to accomplish, including an estimated time to completion?
    • How does the department/unit plan to improve student learning?
    • How does the department/unit plan to improve degree and/or certificate completions or course completions?
    • How does this departmental/unit level plan align to the College’s mission and Strategic Master Plan? Specifically, to which core theme(s), objective(s), and indicator(s) does (do) the departmental/unit level plan align?
    • What resources does the department/unit anticipate needing in order to complete the 5-year plan?

II. Current Status of the Program/Unit

  1. Summary of Previous PUR Findings and Annual Progress Reports (APRs)
    The accompanying table recaps the program/unit’s history of Program/Discipline Reports (PDRs), Program/Unit Reviews (PURs), and Annual Progress Reports (APRs) from the past 5 years. These reports and their findings can be found in your supporting documents folder that was provided at the PUR Self-Study Chair Orientation.
    1. Describe the major findings and recommendations for the program/unit from the last PUR.
    2. Which findings and recommendations has the program/unit addressed?
    3. Which have yet to be accomplished? Which are no longer relevant, and why?
    4. Describe any major changes that the program/unit has undergone since the last PUR.
  2. External Review
    If applicable, describe the major recommendations made by external reviewers, such as advisory boards, articulation committees, program accreditors, etc. What progress had the department/unit made towards those recommendations?

III. Curriculum

  1. Transfer Programs (AA/AS Degrees)
    If applicable, describe how transfer programs allow for seamless transfer and how this is communicated to students.
    1. Which bachelor’s degrees(s) does the program’s AA or AS degree(s) align with, especially within the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE)?
    2. Does the program’s suggested course sequence allow for efficient completion of the AA or AS?
    3. Are there any hidden prerequisites?
    4. Does the AA or AS transfer seamlessly in a 2+2 agreement without a loss of credits or a substantial amount of courses counting only as general electives?
    5. Is program and course information up-to-date in the catalog?
  2. Career and Technical Education Programs (AAS Degrees, Certificates, Skills Certificates)
    If applicable, describe how career and technical education programs are meeting industry needs. The following are potential resources for labor market data:
    U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
    Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR)
    Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada (EDAWN)
    1. What is the evidence for the regional need for the program (DETR and EDAWN data)?
    2. What is the evidence that the program is offering curriculum that meets the latest industry trends or workforce needs?
    3. Are skills certificates and certificates of achievement stackable within an AAS?
    4. Does the program’s suggested course sequence and scheduling allow for efficient completion of the AAS, Certificate of Achievement, or Skills Certificate? Are there any hidden prerequisites?
    5. Is program information up-to-date in the catalog?
  3. Accessibility of Instructional Materials
    The Board of Regents Handbook (Title 4, Chapter 8, Section 15) requires NSHE institutions to provide information and communications technology that has been procured or utilized to be accessible to all, and in particular, to individuals with disabilities, including those who use assistive technologies.

    Section 15.2b: With respect to this policy, "accessible" means that individuals with disabilities are able to independently acquire the same information, engage in the same interactions, and enjoy the same benefits and services within the same timeframe as their nondisabled peers, with substantially equivalent ease of use. If an ICT cannot be made accessible due to technical infeasibility or undue financial or administrative burden, "equally effective alternate access" must be provided in a timely manner. "Equally effective alternate access" means an alternative format, medium, or other aid that timely and accurately communicates the same content as does the original format or medium, and which is appropriate to an individual's disability. To provide equally effective alternate access, alternatives are not required to produce the identical result or level of achievement for individuals with and without disabilities, but must provide appropriate auxiliary aids and services as necessary to afford individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to obtain the same result, gain the same benefit, or reach the same level of achievement, in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs.

    What is the department/unit currently doing or plan to do to help ensure that instructional materials are accessible to students with disabilities?

IV. Program Unit/Assessment

  1. Evidence of Assessing Program (Degree/Certificate) Learning Outcomes
    What is the evidence of assessing program (degree, certificate) learning outcomes? Please answer the following questions.
    1. After reviewing past CARs, what is the evidence of student learning as a result of course assessments?
      • Program learning outcome #1 (my office can pre-populate with the approved outcome)
        • Course #1 that maps to the program SLO
          • Course SLO(s) that map to the program SLO
          • Evidence of student learning of program SLO through course assessment
          • Additional program-level assessment (Certification examinations, e.g.)
        • Course #2 that maps to the program SLO
          • Course SLO(s) that map to the program SLO
          • Evidence of student learning of program SLO through course assessment
          • Additional program-level assessment (Certification examinations, e.g.)
      • Program learning outcome #2 (my office can pre-populate with the approved outcome)
        • Course #1 that maps to the program SLO
          • Course SLO(s) that map to the program SLO
          • Evidence of student learning of program SLO through course assessment
          • Additional program-level assessment (Certification examinations, e.g.)
        • Course #2 that maps to the program SLO
          • Course SLO(s) that map to the program SLO
          • Evidence of student learning of program SLO through course assessment
          • Additional program-level assessment (Certification examinations, e.g.)
    2. After reviewing past GEARs, what is the evidence of student learning as a result of GE assessment?
    3. How does course level assessment map to program level assessment? How do course and GE learning outcomes map to the program learning outcomes?
    4. What is the program doing or planning to do to improve student learning at the program level?
    5. What other levels of assessment are conducted in the department? For example, gateway and pre-requisite courses for other programs, etc.
    6. Overall, what is your program doing to ensure high quality? What is your plan to sustain or improve high quality going forward?
  2. Course SLO Review
    The courses listed in the accompanying table have student learning outcomes (SLOs) that have not been revised in 5 or more years, which may be because the course has not been offered. The Assessment and Planning Office requests that you review SLOs for these courses and describe your plans for these SLOs by completing the table following table. CRC = Curriculum Review Committee.
  3. Course SLO Review
    Please indicate when courses will be assessed over the next five academic years by placing an "X" in the appropriate column of the accompanying table. Some "X’s" may already be present as hold-overs from the last 5-year cycle. Please modify as necessary. Every SLO in every course must be assessed at least one time within a five-year period. Courses that are not offered regularly, such as internships and special topics, should be assessed "as taught."
  4. Curriculum Strategies
    Using the most significant curriculum and assessment-driven findings, discuss strategies to sustain or improve the quality of your program(s) going forward. This may also include deactivation of existing programs or introduction of new programs to meet student and/or industry demand. Are there any internal or external factors anticipated to impact future curriculum development or offerings? If so, how does the department/unit plan address these factors?

V. Enrollment and Demographics

Provide a detailed analysis in each subsection about the demographics of the student population in this program/unit as provided by the Institutional Research Office.

Please contact this office for additional data if you would like to conduct other analyses.

  1. Full-time Equivalency (FTE), Section Count, and Course Fill Rate
    The accompanying tables show how enrollment in your program has changed over the past 5 years. These numbers are compared to your Division and to TMCC as a whole. Average fill rate and unsuccessful enrollment attempts by course data are also displayed. Note: An enrollment attempt is considered unsuccessful if the student tried to enroll in one or more sections of a course but could not because the section was full, and who ultimately did not take the course that term. If they eventually enrolled in another section, they are not counted as unsuccessful. A student is only counted once per course no matter how many section-level attempts they had.

    Please discuss the trends you see, including how they compare to those of the division and College. What might these trends or shifts mean? Discuss any factors that could have led to significant trends or shifts in enrollment and sections offered.

  2. Unsuccessful Enrollment Attempts
    The accompanying table shows average fill rate and unsuccessful enrollment attempts by course data. Note: An enrollment attempt is considered unsuccessful if the student tried to enroll in one or more sections of a course but could not because the section was full, and who ultimately did not take the course that term. If they eventually enrolled in another section, they are not counted as unsuccessful. A student is only counted once per course no matter how many section-level attempts they had.

    Please discuss the trends or shifts you see. What might these trends mean? Discuss any factors that could have led to significant trends or shifts in course fill rate and unsuccessful enrollment attempts.

  3. Evidence of Student-Centered Scheduling
    Describe your department/unit’s scheduling and faculty teaching assignment practices. Using the enrollment data provided in the previous sections and/or other data within your department/unit, what is the evidence that the department/unit engages in student-centered and equitable scheduling?
  4. Student Demographics: Credit Load, Status, Age, Gender, and Ethnicity
    The accompanying tables show the demographics of the students who are declared majors in your program as of last fall. These numbers are compared to TMCC as a whole. (For more detailed term-by-term numbers, refer to the Appendix found in the data files provided during your PUR Orientation.)

    Briefly describe the typical student profile in terms of credit load, status, age, gender, and ethnicity in your program/unit. In cases where the demographics of your students noticeably differ from those of all TMCC students, please discuss the reasons, as you understand them, including any factors that could have led to noticeable trends or shifts. Please note any potential underserved student populations.

  5. Student Recruitment Activities
    Describe any recruitment activities in which the program/unit participates. These may include campus events such as Day on the Hill, external events, or special activities organized by the program/unit. If applicable, describe any partnerships with local high schools or efforts to help high school students enter the program. These might include Career and Technical Education (CTE) agreements, assisting or offering courses for JumpStart, accepting or offering credit by examination, etc. To the best of your knowledge, have these recruitment efforts been successful?
  6. Enrollment Strategies
    Using the most significant enrollment findings, discuss strategies, if needed, to improve enrollment in your program(s)/unit. These may include improving recruitment efforts, especially to underserved students, more efficient and student-centered scheduling, streamlining pathways to completion, etc. Are there any internal or external factors anticipated to impact future enrollment? If so, how does the department/unit plan address these factors?

VI. Student Success

  1. Course Pass Rate
    The accompanying table shows the percent of students completing your courses. These numbers are compared to your Division and TMCC as a whole. Please describe any trends or shifts that you see. What might these trends or shifts mean? Discuss any factors that could have led to significant trends or shifts in student success as indicated by these measures.
  2. Graduation and Transfer
    The first accompanying table shows the number of degrees your program has awarded over the past 5 years. A second set of tables show the rate at which students who graduate from your program transfer to other institutions. This rate is compared to that of all transfer degree-earners and all terminal degree-earners at TMCC.

    Please discuss any trends or shifts that you see. Do your degrees and/or certificates appear to be preparing students to transfer or enter directly into the workforce as intended?

  3. Funding and Instructional Expenditures
    With respect to the student success indicators of credits earned (completion), retention, graduates and transfers, discuss strategies to enhance student success. These may include improving advising and mentoring efforts, improving retention efforts, streamlining pathways to completion, etc. Are there any internal or external factors anticipated to impact future student success in your program or unit? If so, how does the department/unit plan address these factors?

VII. Resources

  1. Faculty Achievement
    Describe the program/unit's full-time (FT) faculty credentials, experience, and highlights of significant activities and/or contributions to TMCC. Please use the following format:
    • Faculty name
    • FTE
    • Degree(s) or professional certification(s) awarded, discipline, awarding institution
    • Most significant accomplishments or examples of expertise outside of academia (please try to limit to 3)
    • Number of years teaching at TMCC
    • Total number of years in academia
    • Primary courses taught
    • Most significant activities or contributions made to TMCC (please try to limit to 3)
    • Faculty name
  2. Faculty Workload
    The first accompanying table above shows the headcount and the FTE (units/15) of full-time vs. part-time faculty who teach your courses. If the FTE of your FT faculty is larger than headcount, this means that the average teaching load of your FT faculty is greater than 15. If the FTE is lower than headcount, this is a reflection of the amount of release given to your FT faculty.

    A second table shows the percent of student credit hours that were taught by FT vs PT faculty within your program's subject area. These student credit hours are not necessarily enrollments of your declared majors; they are enrollments by all students taking your courses. Student credit hours are defined as the sum of (enrolled students x units).

    Describe the trends or shifts in the number of full-time (FT) and part-time (PT) faculty, and the number of student credit hours (SCH) taught by FT and PT faculty since the last program/unit review. What impact, if any, have these trends or shifts had on the program/unit?

  3. Support Staff
    Describe the program/unit’s support staff, including their FTE, major duties, and any specialized credentials necessary to carry out their duties. Is the number of staff adequate to support the program? Explain.
  4. Facilities and Technology
    Describe the facilities and technology used by the program/unit, and discuss any unique requirements. These may include labs, studios, off-campus sites, computer classrooms, specialized equipment, etc. Are the program’s/unit’s facilities and technology adequate to support the program? Explain.
  5. Funding and Instructional Expenditures
    Working with your academic dean, describe the most significant funding source(s) and part-time faculty dollars allocated to the program/unit. These may include regular operating budgets, grants, lab fees, differential tuition, etc. (1) Are funding sources adequate to maintain or grow the program? Should enhanced lab fees or differential tuition be explored? (2) Discuss how part-time faculty dollars have been allocated and used in the program, and discuss their impact on the program/unit’s FTE. Was the program/unit able to offer more sections and/or increase FTE? Were part-time faculty hired to meet student demand for courses?

Future Directions

A. Five-year Plan
Using your curriculum, enrollment, and student success strategies, and after evaluating your proposed resource needs, develop a 5-year plan for the program or unit. Please address the following questions:

  1. What are the major goals that the department or unit hopes to accomplish in the next 5 years? Include an estimated timeline of goal completion.
    1. How does the department or unit plan to improve teaching and student learning?
    2. How does the department or unit plan to improve degree/certificate completions and/or course completions if the department or unit does not offer any degrees/certificates?
  2. How does this plan align to the College's Strategic Master Plan? To which Core Themes and Objectives does the program or unit plan align?

B. Resource Requests

  1. Faculty and/or Staff Positions:
    Identify any new faculty or staff positions requested towards completing your goals in your five-year plan. Please address parts a. through e. for each request made. Copy and paste a. through e. as needed for each additional request.
    1. Faculty and/or staff position requested
    2. Estimated time to hire
    3. Projected measurable outcome(s): What does the program/unit hope to introduce, develop, improve, accomplish, etc. as a result of the hire(s)? Institutional Finding Priority
    4. Institutional Funding Priority: To which of the following institutional funding priorities does the request align?
      1. Compliance with mandates or requirements.
      2. Address and/or mitigate issues of liability.
      3. Address compensation equity.
      4. Improve efficiency and/or effectiveness.
      5. Leverage resources, investments with returns.
      6. Promote professional development.
    5. Alignment to the College's Strategic Master Plan: To which Core Theme(s) and Objective(s) that the resource request align?
  2. Capital Improvement (Facilities)
    Identify any capital improvements or facilities requested towards completing your goals in your five-year plan. Please address parts a. through e. for each request made. Copy and paste a. through e. as needed for each additional request.
    1. Capital improvement or facilities requested
    2. Estimated time to hire
    3. Projected measurable outcome(s): What does the program/unit hope to introduce, develop, improve, accomplish, etc. as a result of the resource request?
    4. Institutional Funding Priority: To which of the following institutional funding priorities does the request align?
      1. Compliance with mandates or requirements.
      2. Address and/or mitigate issues of liability.
      3. Address compensation equity.
      4. Improve efficiency and/or effectiveness.
      5. Leverage resources, investments with returns.
      6. Promote professional development.
    5. Alignment to the College's Strategic Master Plan: To which Core Theme(s) and Objective(s) does the resource request align?
  3. Technology or Specialized Instructional Resources
    Identify any technology or specialized instructional resources requested towards completing your goals in your five-year plan. Please address parts a. through e. for each request made. Copy and paste a. through e. as needed for each additional request.
    1. Technology or specialized resource requested
    2. Estimated time to hire
    3. Projected measurable outcome(s): What does the program/unit hope to introduce, develop, improve, accomplish, etc. as a result of the resource request?
    4. Institutional Funding Priority: To which of the following institutional funding priorities does the request align?
      1. Compliance with mandates or requirements.
      2. Address and/or mitigate issues of liability.
      3. Address compensation equity.
      4. Improve efficiency and/or effectiveness.
      5. Leverage resources, investments with returns.
      6. Promote professional development.
    5. Alignment to the College's Strategic Master Plan: To which Core Theme(s) and Objective(s) does the resource request align?
  4. Professional Development
    Identify any professional development opportunities requested towards completing your goals in your five-year plan. Please address parts a. through f. for each request made. Copy and paste a. through f. as needed for each additional request.
    1. Professional development opportunity requested
    2. Estimated time to hire
    3. Projected measurable outcome(s):
    4. What does the program/unit hope to introduce, develop, improve, accomplish, etc. as a result of the resource request?
    5. Institutional Funding Priority: To which of the following institutional funding priorities does the request align?
      1. Compliance with mandates or requirements.
      2. Address and/or mitigate issues of liability.
      3. Address compensation equity.
      4. Improve efficiency and/or effectiveness.
      5. Leverage resources, investments with returns.
      6. Promote professional development.
    6. Alignment to the College’s Strategic Master Plan: To which Core Theme(s) and Objective(s) does the resource request align?

Appendices

Where applicable, the Appendices section must include:

  1. A References page for any external references cited in the body of the report.
  2. A copy of each program (degree, emphasis or certificate) worksheet from the most recent College Catalog (provided in your PUR Supporting Documents folder).
  3. A copy of any transfer agreements between your program and another institution,
  4. A copy of any College Technical Education (CTE) agreements between your program and high schools.
  5. Copies of all advisory board minutes since the last PUR.
  6. A copy of the most recent programmatic accreditation report.
  7. Any other pertinent information.

Glossary

APR: Annual Progress Report. Faculty submit annual updates on the self-study recommendations made by the Academic Standards and Assessment Committee, Vice President of Academic Affairs, and President for programs/units on the APR document.

ASA: Academic Standards and Assessment Committee (formerly the Student Learning Outcomes & Assessment Committee, or SLOA). The Faculty Senate standing committee who, among other duties, assumes the responsibility of program/unit review in collaboration with the Assessment and Planning Office.

BOR: Board of Regents. Much like a corporate board of directors, Nevada’s Board of Regents governs the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE). Elected to serve a six-year term, the 13 Regents set policies and approve budgets for Nevada's entire public system of higher education: four community colleges, one state college, two universities and one research institute.

CAR: Course Assessment Report. A CAR describes methods of student learning outcomes assessment, assessment results, and use of the results for improving student learning. Faculty submit annual CARs according to the 5-year assessment cycle established by the department or unit in their most recent Program/Unit Review.

CRC: Curriculum Review Committee (formerly Curriculum, Assessment & Programs, or CAP). The Faculty Senate Standing Committee, that among other duties, reviews student learning outcomes for submitted courses.

Department: A formally recognized academic organization within a division. It will include at least one program or discipline. The Physical Sciences Department, for example, includes the Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology and Physics disciplines.

Discipline: A sequence of related courses using one prefix, which do not lead directly to an academic credential in, and of themselves. Core Humanities is an example.

Instructional Unit: Defined by departments or programs or disciplines as constituting a logical organization of courses and/or programs.

Program: An academic organization that offers at least one formal academic credential (AA, AS, AAS, AGS, Certificate of Achievement, Skills Certificate). A program may be part of a larger department, such as the Engineering Program in the Physical Sciences Department, or operate independently such as Dental Hygiene.

PUR: Program/Unit Review. The PUR is a central component of the integrated assessment/planning process at TMCC. Every program/unit in the College completes a comprehensive self-study on a five-year cycle. The self-study combines self-examination and the use of data to produce an integrated, strategic approach to ongoing instructional development and improvement.

SLO: Student Learning Outcomes. Identified knowledge, abilities, or skills that we want students to have acquired upon completion of course or program. We determine whether students have acquired these outcomes through assessment of SLOs.