Anthropology Faculty and Staff

Department People
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Suzanne Amodio

Part-time Lecturer

Received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from University of California Berkeley (1993) with a minor in Southeast Asian Studies and her Master of Arts (1997) and Ph.D. Candidacy (1999) in Anthropology from University of California San Diego. Her master's research on international migration of women from the Philippines led to her ongoing dissertation study of the psychological and cognitive effects of mothers' migration on children. Her interests include issues of identity, imagination (religion, play, etc.), cross cultural human development, enculturation, and culture change. She has conducted research in Indonesia (ethnic identity of Toba Batak, Sumatra), Malaysia (street artists as agents of acculturation), and in the U.S. (theater as ritual) and participated in group research in Zimbabwe (mother and infant health/nutrition), South Australia (ecology), and Borneo (orangutan behavior and conservation).

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Andy Carey

Part-time Lecturer

Received his Bachelor of Arts and Masters of Arts degrees in Anthropology from the University of Nevada, Reno (1991 and 1996, respectively). He conducted the archival research and prepared the documentation for the permanent historic exhibit at the Pershing County Court House in Lovelock, Nevada. Mr. Carey is currently completing his doctorate at University of New Mexico and teaches TMCC's online ANTH 101 courses.

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Julia Hammett

Community College Professor

Received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology from San Jose State University (1980) and her Master of Arts and Doctoral degrees in Anthropology from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1986 and 1991, respectively) with specialties in North American paleoethnobotany, ecological anthropology, and North American archaeology. She has conducted research in four regions of North America: the Southwest, California, the Southeast, and the Great Basin. Her research combines ecological, archaeological, and historical data to investigate prehistoric and historic landscapes and traditional land use patterns. Her primary research areas are in the San Francisco Bay Area working in conjunction with Stanford University and the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe and Southern Coastal California. She spent her 2015/2016 sabbatical year working with TMCC students on a research project tied to the Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California. Her current focus is to help engage students, colleagues, and community members in obtaining skill sets and developing strategies that will lead to a more sustainable future. She is currently the TMCC Sustainability Advocate and the college Implementation Liaison for Second Nature.

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Arthur Krupicz

Part-time Lecturer

Received his Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from University of Maryland (1996) and his Master of Arts in Anthropology from University of Arkansas (2000) with emphasis in archaeology. His research and practice have focused upon public education and outreach, particularly to children and young adults. Mr. Krupicz has worked with numerous museums, including the American Museum of Natural History (New York), Denver Museum of Nature and Science; and most recently he served as Executive Director of the Children's Museum in Carson City, NV. In addition to his work in the non-profit sector, Mr. Krupicz initiated a statewide, archaeological site steward program for the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (SHPO) and has conducted archaeological fieldwork in 20 states and the Caribbean.

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Joylin Namie

Program Coordinator and Instructor

Comes to us from Utah Valley University where she was Associate Professor of Anthropology in the Behavioral Science Department. A first-generation college student herself, Dr. Namie is committed to quality undergraduate teaching and the promotion of student scholarship and success. While at UVU, she mentored nearly 40 independent anthropology student research projects, as well as collaborating with students in her own research. Of the three articles she published most recently, all were co-researched with students, one was co-authored with a student, and another accompanied by a documentary film co-produced with students. All three projects sent students to multiple academic and professional conferences, including meetings of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), the Society for Applied Anthropology (SFAA), the National Conference for Undergraduate Research (NCUR), and the Utah Conference for Undergraduate research (UCUR). Dr. Namie also organized Utah’s first undergraduate conference in anthropology and created and served as faculty mentor for her Department’s first peer-reviewed, student-produced undergraduate journal. In addition to teaching and scholarship, Dr. Namie helped build the anthropology program at UVU, including serving as Program Coordinator, creating and revising curriculum, hiring and training adjunct faculty, and developing assessment tools. She also served on the university’s Institutional Review Board and was a Global/Intercultural Fellow, assisting in the creation and assessment of courses, training, and initiatives aimed at increasing openness to diversity and an atmosphere of inclusion on campus. Dr. Namie’s research interests are in the areas of food, gender, media, health, and changing attitudes towards water use in the intermountain west.