TMCC

Workforce Development and Continuing Education

Property Management

Diverse Opportunities and Challenges

As a certified property manager, you'll be qualified to work on management teams overseeing office buildings, single family dwellings, shopping malls and more. In Nevada, property managers must be licensed real estate agents.

Obtain the required Nevada Property Management Permit by successfully completing TMCC's three-day Property Management Program.

Forget sitting at a desk all day long.

Train for a career that gets you out of the office and around other people. The Institute of Real Estate Management (IREM) states that property managers are "responsible for the administration, operation, marketing and maintenance of real estate in order to achieve the objectives of the property's owner."

I'd been a property manager for 25 years, so I thought the Property Management 30 Years in 24 Hours class would be a waste of my time. I was pleasantly surprised. It was well-organized and very informative. I have referred countless staff members to take this class. As the supervisor for our Nevada staff, it is nice to know that when I send someone to it, they will have a better understanding of property management as a whole.

Dorothy Maynard, General Manager, Coldwell Banker Select Real Estate of Nevada

Professional Opportunities

A wide array of entities—from commercial banks and federal agencies to corporations and property management agencies—hire property managers to manage their assets. Most managers work in one of three categories: onsite and resident management, property management or asset management. Property managers are needed to provide services to:

  • Apartment and condo complexes,
  • Homeowner associations,
  • Shopping malls,
  • Office buildings,
  • Home rentals,
  • Industrial properties, and more.

No Work Day is Like Any Other

As a property manager, you'll most likely oversee multiple properties and be responsible for negotiating leases, advertising vacancies, collecting rent payments, overseeing the building's finances and supervising maintenance crews. Your specific duties could include:

  • Identifying management goals and implementing strategies to reach those goals,
  • Analyzing regional and local trends to develop target markets for new tenants,
  • Developing realistic budgets and setting rents maximizing net income,
  • Building and maintaining good relationships with tenants, and
  • Striving to enhance the property's value.

Earnings vary with your experience level. If you have entrepreneurial leanings, you could even start your own management firm. Onsite managers can earn $25,000 to $45,000; multiple site managers, $55,000 to $80,000; and a mall operations manager's salary can reach upwards of $90,000. And, if you run your own management firm, you can earn more than $100,000. Those who've attained IREM's Certified Property Manager designation earn an average of $70,000.

Property Management Career Resources